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About a Jellyfish, cannot resist posting this:

This November 2009, a boat was capsized off Chiba in Japan, as its three-man crew was trying to haul in a net containing dozens of huge Nomura jellyfish, a gelatinous beast that has inundated the waters of Japan since 2005. The giants, which can grow 6.5 feet (2 meters) wide and weigh up to 450 pounds (220 kilograms), have clogged fishing nets and poisoned potential catches with their toxic stings, costing coastal fishers billions of yen.

The gelatinous seaborne creatures are blamed for decimating fishing industries in the Bering and Black seas, forcing the shutdown of seaside power and desalination plants in Japan, the Middle East and Africa, and terrorizing beachgoers worldwide, the U.S. National Science Foundation says.

Scientists have since been racing to unlock the mysteries of this giant jellyfish species in an attempt to forecast invasions and prevent damages.

This June researchers at Hiroshima University made some of the first surveys of the jellyfish’s spawning grounds off the Chinese coast. The team found a huge new brood lurking in the waters, prompting experts to warn that another giant jellyfish invasion may be on the horizon.

Japanese scientists speculated that the jellyfish are drifting from China’s Yangtze River Delta, where unusually heavy rains may have created a flow that is pushing the jellyfish flotilla to Japan.

Another theory suggests that seas heated by global warming are better suited for breeding, turning the Nomura’s otherwise modest numbers into an armada.

As the research continues, Japanese fishers continue to grapple with another issue: What to do with all the jellyfish they’ve caught? So far, resourceful anglers have turned their unwanted catch into crab food, fertilizer, and novelty snacks—served dried and salted.

Reported on the National Geographic website.

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The gelatinous seaborne creatures are blamed for decimating fishing industries in the Bering and Black seas, forcing the shutdown of seaside power and desalination plants in Japan, the Middle East and Africa, and terrorizing beachgoers worldwide, the U.S. National Science Foundation says.

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